#SuitsLF

#SuitsLF was designed to capture the hidden stories behind the faces of business. Every photograph and story helps bring forward a unique perspective about each person. Catch each #SuitsLF post every Friday when we release photos and their corresponding stories on our social media platforms!

20220315-MJB05080.jpg

Julia Villoso is a third-year bachelor of arts student and the UASU vice-president operations and finance elect.

“As a student of the UofA, the largest skill I’ve gained is learning how to empower those around me. My leadership style has drastically changed during my time here, and it really changed for the better. Being a good leader means being able to uplift those around you so they can truly achieve their highest potential. I was able to learn and practice these skills in my time in student governance. By chairing committees, you learn how integral it is that every single member is working at their full capacity towards your shared goal. Through my work in Council, I was also able to rejuvenate the Councillor Mentorship Program to encourage more students to get involved with student governance and empower other Councillors to do the same. I provided support and check-ins whenever needed, and organized a mentorship training session to ensure they felt supported throughout the process. Uplifting others is the utmost important aspect of leadership, and it can also be translated to other areas in life as well.”

Q: What skills have you gained as a student? How do you plan to use these skills?

“As a student at the UofA, the largest skill I’ve gained is learning how to empower those around me. My leadership style has drastically changed during my time here, and it really changed for the better. Being a good leader means being able to uplift those around you so they can truly achieve their highest potential. I was able to learn and practice these skills in my time in student governance. By chairing committees, you learn how integral it is that every single member is working at their full capacity towards your shared goal. Through my work in Council, I was also able to rejuvenate the Councillor Mentorship Program to encourage more students to get involved with student governance and empower other Councillors to do the same. I provided support and check-ins whenever needed, and organized a mentorship training session to ensure they felt supported throughout the process. Uplifting others is the utmost important aspect of leadership, and it can also be translated to other areas in life as well. “

 

Q: Are you a part of any student groups or hold any roles within the university?

“I am currently the Vice-President Operations and Finance elect of the University of Alberta Students’ Union (UASU)! A lot of small moments led to me deciding to run for this position. I've always loved being involved on campus and specifically with the Students’ Union with having been an Arts Councillor for two years now. This year, I’ve also taken on different hats within the governance space not only through becoming an Arts Councillor for the General Faculties Council, but in other levels of governance as well. The Organization of Arts Students and Interdisciplinary Studies has enabled me to represent the Social Sciences departments within the Arts Faculty as a Social Sciences Councillor and an Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Director. I also had the opportunity to be the Vice President Finance of the Womens’ and Gender Studies Students’ Association! “

 

Q: What advice would you offer to future UofA students?

“My one piece of advice would be to see loss as a redirection. I’m currently the Vice-President Operations and Finance elect, but it wasn’t without its own set of hardships. Before winning, I put my name into the race the year prior and unfortunately, lost by a slim margin. Though it was difficult for me to come to terms with this, it was because of this that I was able to grow as a student representative. I used this loss to recentre myself and my purpose within governance. I needed to figure out the best path for me and it was to rerun for Council. I used my loss to become a better student advocate. I brought attention to issues that were overlooked on campus. I kickstarted projects no one wanted to touch. I put my work on the forefront for students to see. I was able to use my loss to fuel my growth.”

20220315-MJB05097.jpg

Roel is the co-owner of Filistix, a campus food staple! The restaurant continues to serve students and the UofA community through their location on the lower floor of the Students’ Union Building. You can check them out here

@filistix.sub (SUB location)

@filistix.dt (Downtown location)

“To say that these last two years have been a challenge is an understatement. We were forced to adapt to the ever changing health and business restrictions that arose. We are grateful to have survived to this point and we are optimistic that things will finally get back on track this year on campus.”

IMG-20220414-WA0001.jpg

Ebun Akomolafe is a third-year Strategy, Entrepreneurship and Management major. She has participated in 11 case competitions and has recently placed 2nd in the Map the System competition.

“The most influential experience I’ve had as a business student has been case competitions. For better or worse, I’ve loved being the center of attention since I was very little, so I’ve always been drawn to public speaking. I’d been participating in speech & debate tournaments since elementary school because Saskatchewan is cooler than Alberta and the organizing body there starts students sooner. But when I entered university and learned about case competitions, I felt like they had been created just for me. 
They were an avenue for me to develop and present my ideas as creatively as I wanted. They gave me so much room to be expressive in telling the story of the journey to a recommendation, while still challenging me to be well-reasoned in my problem solving. The competitive element just checked off a final box for me. I have the best time when I’m representing UAlberta internationally - but money’s great too. I’ve been funding my daily lunch needs with prize money since starting, which I consider a benchmark of success. 
With each competition has come a new team of wonderful people I’ve learned from and new growth I’ve had to undergo - like handling the financials (which are the bane of my existence) for the first time. I’ve grown so much more comfortable being uncomfortable, and with each competition, my confidence only grows.”